Megan Twohey Headshot

Megan Twohey

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist

BIO

Megan Twohey is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times and co-author of the bestselling book SHE SAID: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement. The book takes readers behind the scenes of Twohey and Jodi Kantor's 2017 investigation of Harvey Weinstein, which helped trigger the global reckoning on sexual misconduct. The investigation shared in the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service as well as the George Polk award for national reporting, and won many other prizes.

Twohey has focused much of her reporting on the treatment of women and children. In 2016, she told the stories of women who accused Donald J. Trump of groping and other sexual misconduct. She uncovered an underground network where parents gave away adopted children they no longer wanted to strangers met on the Internet in a practice known as re-homing. The series, “The Child Exchange," showed how this dangerous black market took place with no government oversight and at great risk to children, and was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. Twohey also was one of the first journalists to expose how police and prosecutors were shelving DNA evidence collected after sex crimes, robbing victims of the chance for justice. In response to her stories, Illinois passed the first state law mandating the testing of every rape kit.

SHE SAID will be adapted into a film by Plan B Entertainment, the makers of Selma and Moonlight. Twohey is a contributor to NBC and MSNBC. A native of Evanston, Ill., she lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

Megan Twohey is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times and co-author of the bestselling book SHE SAID: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement. The book takes readers behind the scenes of Twohey and Jodi Kantor's 2017 investigation of Harvey Weinstein, which helped trigger the global reckoning on sexual misconduct. The investigation shared in the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service as well as the George Polk award for national reporting, and won many other prizes.

Twohey has focused much of her reporting on the treatment of women and children. In 2016, she told the stories of women who accused Donald J. Trump of groping and other sexual misconduct. She uncovered an underground network where parents gave away adopted children they no longer wanted to strangers met on the Internet in a practice known as re-homing. The series, “The Child Exchange," showed how this dangerous black market took place with no government oversight and at great risk to children, and was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. Twohey also was one of the first journalists to expose how police and prosecutors were shelving DNA evidence collected after sex crimes, robbing victims of the chance for justice. In response to her stories, Illinois passed the first state law mandating the testing of every rape kit.

SHE SAID will be adapted into a film by Plan B Entertainment, the makers of Selma and Moonlight. Twohey is a contributor to NBC and MSNBC. A native of Evanston, Ill., she lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

Media
SPEECH TOPICS

She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement

Books & Media
She Said book cover